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7-12-13 OT: Architeuthisunami



Giant squid From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Page semi-protected This article is about squid of the genus Architeuthis. For other large squid, see cephalopod size. For the post-metal group, see Giant Squid (band).

Giant squid
Giant squid, Architeuthis sp., modified from an illustration by A.E. Verrill, 1880
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Mollusca
Class: Cephalopoda
Subclass: Coleoidea
Order: Teuthida
Suborder: Oegopsina
Family: Architeuthidae
Pfeffer, 1900
Genus: Architeuthis
Steenstrup in Harting, 1860
Species
  • Architeuthis dux Steenstrup, 1857
  • ?Architeuthis hartingii Verrill, 1875
  • ?Architeuthis japonica Pfeffer, 1912
  • ?Architeuthis kirkii Robson, 1887
  • ?Architeuthis martensi (Hilgendorf, 1880)
  • ?Architeuthis physeteris (Joubin, 1900)
  • ?Architeuthis sanctipauli (Velain, 1877)
  • ?Architeuthis stockii (Kirk, 1882)
Worldwide giant squid distribution based on recovered specimens
Synonyms
  • Architeuthus Steenstrup, 1857
  • Dinoteuthis More, 1875
  • Dubioteuthis Joubin, 1900
  • Megaloteuthis Kent, 1874
  • Megateuthis Hilgendorf in Carus, 1880
  • Megateuthus Hilgendorf, 1880
  • Mouchezis Velain, 1877
  • Plectoteuthis Owen, 1881
  • Steenstrupia Kirk, 1882

The giant squid (genus: Architeuthis) is a deep-ocean dwelling squid in the family Architeuthidae, represented by as many as eight species. Giant squid can grow to a tremendous size (see Deep-sea gigantism): recent estimates put the maximum size at 13 m (43 ft) for females and 10 m (33 ft) for males from the posterior fins to the tip of the two long tentacles (second only to thecolossal squid at an estimated 14 m (46 ft),[1] one of the largest living organisms). The mantle is about 2 m (6.6 ft) long (more for females, less for males), and the length of the squid excluding its tentacles is about 5 m (16 ft). Claims of specimens measuring 20 m (66 ft) or more have not been scientifically documented.

On 30 September 2004, researchers from the National Science Museum of Japan and the Ogasawara Whale Watching Associationtook the first images of a live giant squid in its natural habitat.[2] Several of the 556 photographs were released a year later. The same team successfully filmed a live adult giant squid for the first time on 4 December 2006.[3]

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