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4-4-14 OT

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English haile, hail, from Old English hæġl, hæġel, from Proto-Germanic *haglaz (compare West Frisian heil, Low German Hagel, Dutch hagel, German Hagel, Danish hagl). Either from Proto-Indo-European *kagʰlos ("pebble"), or from*ḱoḱló-, a reduplication of *ḱel- ("cold") (compare Old Norse héla ("frost")).

Root-cognates outside of Germanic include Welsh caill ("testicle"), Breton kell ("testicle"), Lithuanian šešėlis ("shade, shadow"), Ancient Greek κάχληξ (káchlēx, "pebble"), Albanian çakëll ("pebble"), Sanskrit शिशिर (śíśira, "cool, cold").

Noun[edit]

hail (uncountable)

  1. Balls or pieces of ice falling as precipitation, often in connection with a thunderstorm.
Derived terms[edit] Translations[edit] [show ▼]balls of ice

Verb[edit]

hail (third-person singular simple present hails, present participle hailing, simple past and past participle hailed)

  1. (impersonal) Said of the weather when hail is falling.They say it's going to hail tomorrow.
  2. (transitive) to send or release hailThe cloud would hail down furiously within a few minutes.
Translations[edit] [show ▼]said when hail is falling

Etymology 2[edit]

The adjective hail is a variant of hale ("health, safety") (from the early 13th century). The transitive verb with the meaning "to salute" is also from the 13th century. The cognate verb heal is already Old English (hǣlan), from Proto-Germanic *hailijaną("to make healthy, whole, to heal"). Also cognate is whole, from Old English hāl (the spelling with wh- is unetymological, introduced in the 15th century).

Verb[edit]

hail (third-person singular simple present hails, present participle hailing, simple past and past participle hailed)

  1. (transitive) to greet; give salutation to; salute.
  2. (transitive) To name; to designate; to call. [quotations ▼]He was hailed as a hero.
  3. (transitive) to call out loudly in order to gain the attention ofHail a taxi.
Derived terms[edit] Translations[edit] [show ▼]to greet [show ▼]to call out loudly in order to gain the attention of

Adjective[edit]

hail (comparative more hail, superlative most hail)

  1. (obsolete) Healthy, whole, safe.

Interjection[edit]

hail

  1. An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting. [quotations ▼]

Scots[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English hāl ("healthy, safe"), from Proto-Germanic *hailaz ("whole, safe, sound"), from Proto-Indo-European*kóh₂ilus ("healthy, whole").

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

hail (comparative hailer, superlative hailest)

  1. whole
  2. free or recovered from disease, healthy, wholesome
  3. (of people, parts of the body, etc.) free from injury, safe, sound, unhurt
  4. (of material objects and of time, numbers etc.) whole, entire, complete, sound, unbroken, undamaged


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