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6/3 OT: You can't have your cake and eat it

You can't have your cake and eat it From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Have one's cake and eat it too)

You can't have your cake and eat it (too) is a popular English idiomatic proverb or figure of speech.[1] Many people misunderstand the meanings of "have" and "eat" as used here but still understand the proverb in its entirety and intent and use it in this form. Some people feel this form of the proverb is incorrect and illogical and instead prefer "you can't eat your cake and have it (too)", which is in fact closer to the original form of the proverb[2] (see further explanations below) but very rare today. Other rare variants use "keep" instead of "have".[3]

The proverb literally means "you cannot both possess your cake and eat it", "you cannot eat the cake and keep it" or "you can't eat the cake and have it still". It can be used to say that one cannot or should not have or want more than one deserves or can handle, or that one cannot or should not try to have two incompatible things. The proverb's meaning is similar to the phrases "you can't have it both ways" and "you can't have the best of both worlds." Conversely, in the positive sense, it refers to "having it both ways" or "having the best of both worlds."

Having to choose whether to have or eat your cake illustrates the concept of trade-offs or opportunity cost.[4][5][6]



Literal meaning[edit]

Paul Brians, Professor of English at Washington State University, points out that perhaps a more logical or easier to understand version of this saying is, "You can’t eat your cake and have it too." Professor Brians writes that a common source of confusion about this idiom stems from the verb to have which in this case indicates that once eaten, keeping possession of the cake is no longer possible, seeing that it is in your stomach (and no longer exists as a cake).[16]

Alternatively, the two verbs can be understood to represent a sequence of actions, so one can indeed "have" one's cake and then "eat" it. Consequently, the literal meaning of the reversed idiom doesn't match the metaphorical meaning. The phrase can also have specialized meaning in academic contexts; Classicist Katharina Volk of Columbia University has used the phrase to describe the development of poetic imagery in Latin didactic poetry, naming the principle behind the imagery's adoption and application the "have-one's-cake-and-eat-it-too principle".[17]

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