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SBN - Around the Horn

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As a new periodic feature, Adam wanted to start collecting posts of note from around SportsblogNation, so here's ... (dramatic pause) ... SBN - Around the Horn.

The Rev talks about the winter meetings, and says that the Marlins would want Adenhardt, Ervin Santana, Brandon Wood and Howie Kendrick for Miguel Cabrera. He then says that because of the complicated shell-game nature of the winter meetings, and some amazing Sith Lord powers that Tony Reagins learned from Stoneman, the Angels could get Cabrera for Kendrick, Willits, Eric Aybar and Dustin Moseley. Or something. My head hearts after reading the post.

Jeff Sullivan over at Lookout Landing has an interesting post about how he kind of wants the Angels to trade for Miguel Cabrera, reasoning that as a liability defensively he gives back a non-insignificant amount of the runs he creates. Jeff also has a somewhat different take on the blowup relating to Bill Conlin, saying that the blogger shouldn't have posted the email exchange with Conlin. Jeff says that if Conlin should get fired for his statements in a private email, you should get divorced for telling your buddy your wife doesn't put out enough.

Someone-not-Blez has a take on the Torii signing over at A's Nation, emphasizing how this signing indicates that the Angels think Vlad's legs are going to fall off soon and that his back is probably being devoured by termites.

As a fan of a lousy team, it's cute looking at even lousier teams' offseason wish lists. Not only did they want to sign Cordero, they want to sign Andruw Jones, which is like me wanting to be Tom Brady's child's stepfather.

Update [2007-11-25 2:37 by benmor78]: Anyone interested in CrashburnAlley's take on Jeff Sullivan's criticisms should read the comments to Jeff's post. He responds several times in there, and there's some interesting discussion on whether this sort of thing can create a chilling effect on writers (or, by extension, any public figure) corresponding in private with the public.